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Ban on LA County In-Person Dining to Take Effect on Wednesday; Pasadena Restaurants Not Affected

first_img Top of the News STAFF REPORT First Heatwave Expected Next Week Photo by James CarboneA ban prohibiting in-person dining at L.A. County restaurants will go into effect at 10 p.m. on Wednesday.Pasadena will not be impacted by the ban.At Monday’s Pasadena City Council meeting city officials announced they were still monitoring the data and were not shuttering in-person dining.But late Tuesday afternoon, the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors rejected a motion by Supervisors Kathryn Barger and Janice Hahn to reconsider the ban on outdoor dining being imposed due to a surge in coronavirus cases.The ban was announced Sunday night when the county’s five-day average of daily new cases topped the threshold of 4,000.The threshold was established by the county last week, along with a more restrictive tier that would trigger a new stay-at-home order if the daily five-day case average topped 4,500. The county reached that threshold Monday.The county restriction ends in-person dining for three weeks.“Businesses have made incredible sacrifices to align with safety protocols to remain open in order to pay their bills and feed their families,” Supervisor Barger said. “Our hospitalization rates are among the lowest we’ve seen. Yet, the rationale for further closures is tied to the number of patients in the hospital. We’ve come a long way to support workers and residents who are struggling to stay afloat and should not regress on the progress we’ve made.”The Los Angeles Economic Development Corporation predicted that approximately 700,000 jobs in the food industry would be lost during this shutdown.The LAEDC also highlighted that approximately 75% of all projected job losses would be those earning $50,000 or less.The California Restaurant Association unsuccessfully attempted to stop the action with a restraining order. A judge did allow a lawsuit to continue.“The recent order with no stated scientific basis from L.A. County singles out a specific industry and could jeopardize thousands of jobs,” Jot Condie, president/CEO of the California Restaurant Association, said in a statement announcing the legal challenge. “There are thousands of restaurants and many thousands more employees who could be out on the street right before the holiday season.”Association attorney Dennis Ellis told reporters he was disappointed in the ruling, but said the organization hasn’t seen any evidence that outdoor dining — which was already restricted to half of overall capacity last week — has fueled the coronavirus surge.“We have not been able to see what the county has to support the notion that outdoor dining at 50% capacity, consistent with what the governor has authorized in his blueprint, is inappropriate and needs to be shut down,” Ellis said.“Outdoor dining is probably more dangerous in terms of contagion than any other kind of business,” Supervisor Sheila Kuehl said earlier. She said diners at restaurants “sit for hours with no masks on” and are in close proximity to servers and patrons walking by.Long Beach, which has its own health department, also plans to bar in-person dining Wednesday night. The Long Beach Restaurant Association blasted the move and plans to hold a news conference Wednesday demanding a meeting with city and county health officials.In a statement, the association accused health officials of attacking an “easy target” to blame for the surge in cases, without any evidence. Community News CITY NEWS SERVICE/STAFF REPORT Pasadena Will Allow Vaccinated People to Go Without Masks in Most Settings Starting on Tuesday Herbeauty9 Of The Best Family Friendly Dog BreedsHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty12 Most Breathtaking Trends In Fashion HistoryHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty7 Most Startling Movie Moments We Didn’t Realize Were InsensitiveHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyCostume That Makes Actresses Beneath Practically UnrecognizableHerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeautyInstall These Measures To Keep Your Household Safe From Covid19HerbeautyHerbeautyHerbeauty10 Secrets That Eastern Women Swear By To Stay Young LongerHerbeautyHerbeauty Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked * Subscribe More Cool Stuff Community News Ban on LA County In-Person Dining to Take Effect on Wednesday; Pasadena Restaurants Not Affected CITY NEWS SERVICE CONTRIBUTED TO THIS STORY Published on Tuesday, November 24, 2020 | 4:25 pm Make a commentcenter_img 10 recommended0 commentsShareShareTweetSharePin it faithfernandez More » ShareTweetShare on Google+Pin on PinterestSend with WhatsApp,Donald CommunityPCC- COMMUNITYVirtual Schools PasadenaHomes Solve Community/Gov/Pub SafetyPasadena Public WorksPASADENA EVENTS & ACTIVITIES CALENDARClick here for Movie Showtimes Community News Name (required)  Mail (required) (not be published)  Website  EVENTS & ENTERTAINMENT | FOOD & DRINK | THE ARTS | REAL ESTATE | HOME & GARDEN | WELLNESS | SOCIAL SCENE | GETAWAYS | PARENTS & KIDS STAFF REPORT Pasadena’s ‘626 Day’ Aims to Celebrate City, Boost Local Economy Get our daily Pasadena newspaper in your email box. Free.Get all the latest Pasadena news, more than 10 fresh stories daily, 7 days a week at 7 a.m. Business News Home of the Week: Unique Pasadena Home Located on Madeline Drive, Pasadenalast_img read more

Morse’s code

first_imgInspectorMorse may have been loved by millions of viewers, but how would his managementtechniques be judged in a real workplace situation and how, asks  Paul Simpson, would we view him as a workcolleague?Chief inspector Morse would never have become an inspector if his bosses hadmeasured him against any of the usual checklists of the qualities that make agood manager. He has the people skills of a social misfit, he is often abusiveor offensive when directing staff, his alcohol consumption would triggerdisciplinary action in most workplaces and he hardly leads his team by buildingconsensus or encouraging input from his employees. His able sidekick, detective sergeant Lewis, may occasionally chip in, andthe pathologist’s expertise is eagerly sought, but in Morse’s eyes anyoneelse’s input is best confined to buying him a pint of beer or making sure thecoffee he is handed at the scene of the crime doesn’t contain powdered milk. Even John Thaw, who played him to such good effect, spoke of Morse as”the old bugger”, admitting his fictional alter ego was snobbish,patronising, and “totally sad”. Fittingly, for a fictional detectivecreated in a society where workaholism is a national disease (and whosegovernment is threatened with legal action over its failure to restrict workinghours), Morse has no personal life. As Thaw once said: “It is the job witha capital J which makes him sad because his work is his whole life.” Morse is incorrect, not just politically but in the broader cultural sense:a curmudgeonly, borderline alcoholic, workaholic, upper class snob with Ludditeattitudes who would, you suspect, regard the very idea of human resources as anintellectual con trick. Yet he became so popular in his TV incarnation, that heregularly drew 12 million viewers and new episodes were even helicoptered toNorth Sea oil rigs. Steeped in real ale and the classics, Morse is as thoroughly British asBasil Fawlty was in the 1970s. But while John Cleese’s hotelier was a cruellyaccurate send-up of the flawed, fawning psyche of the British manager of yore,Morse is a slightly idealised, ennobled version of the kind of employee foundin every workplace. Every company has at least one executive whose talents areless conspicuous to their superiors than their unfortunate habit of refusing totoe the party line, yet whose craft and non-conformity inspire those aroundthem. Morse isn’t the only curmudgeonly-but-decent workaholic solving the UK’sfictional crimes. Down the social scale (but also on ITV) is David Jason’sdetective inspector Jack Frost, who may not drink to excess or crackcrosswords, but exhibits the same fine disregard for forms, office politics andthe repercussions of his workaholic habits on his personal life. Morse andFrost are merely the most visible of their breed. Anyone who has watched much police drama on TV would probably conclude thata real maverick cop would be one who, given the chance to rush to a crimescene, would say: “Oh, no thanks Super, I’ve got these forms to fill in,the latest home office directives to cast an eye over, and besides, I’m worriedwe might be over budget this month.” Nor indeed does the stereotype of the grumpy, middle-aged maverick stop withMorse and Frost. American movies are full of them, often played by actors suchas Clint Eastwood and Robert Redford, for whom middle age is already a memory.They are designed to inspire us with their refusal to play by anyone else’srules, their steady certainty that they are right and the astonishing effecttheir wrinkly charisma has on the opposite sex. In part, it is tempting to seethese stereotypes as a fantastic exercise in wish fulfilment by the writers whomay not be fabulously rich, secure, or sexy, and have never had the nerve tosay no or even ‘perhaps’ to their bosses (see above right). But do the fictional stereotypes they create and we consume matter?Probably. The replacement of Jack Warner’s benevolent play-it-by-the-book Dixon OfDock Green with a generation of rogues and mavericks like Jack Regan in TheSweeney (also played by Thaw), Morse and Frost does reflect a shift inattitude, especially the demise of deference and our increased cynicism aboutauthority. Most of our small screen detectives now solve crimes despite theauthorities’ involvement, not because of it. The most sympathetic authority figure in any of these dramas – Morse’s bosschief superintendent Strange – is well meaning, but subject to politicalpressure, lacking Morse’s imagination and often absurdly impatient for results.Morse is the hero in an age where our distrust of geographically remote figuresof authority, be they prime ministers or company vice-presidents, is summed upin the gag about the biggest lie in business being “I’m from head officeand I’m here to help you”. If we trust any manager these days, we trustthose on the coalface like Morse or Frost. Fending off retirement Morse may seem unique (and even his popularity hasn’t sent his long secretfirst name Endeavour shooting up the list of top boy’s names), but in many wayshe is so typical as to be commonplace. Sorry Morse, but by the time the TVseries ended, the grumpy inspector was a 50-something fending off retirement,hardly untypical in a country where, by 2031, 60 per cent of adults will beover 45. A recent survey in the US found that half the nation’s managers in themanufacturing industry are due to retire in the next five years, and similarpressures are already at work in the UK. Equally typically, as Morse’s careerand life peter out, no obvious successor has emerged or been groomed by hisboss Strange. His isolation is increasingly representative of society. A 2002 report byThe Future Foundation found that, for the first time, more Britons live aloneor as a single parent than within a traditional family unit. Even his death isnot that rare: alcohol played a large part in his fatal illness – as it does in33,000 deaths in the UK each year. The parallels between Morse and non-fictional mortals deepen when youexamine his managerial style. He does not tolerate fools gladly, regardingalmost anyone as foolish if they disagree with him; yet (in his own eyes) is firmbut fair. He is so shocked when Strange suggests that he speaks to Lewis”in your way – dismissively” that he spends the rest of the episodecomplimenting Lewis on his work. After the second “well done Lewis”,his sergeant is worried enough to ask: “Are you feeling alright,sir?” Nor is he especially sympathetic when Lewis’ family commitmentsprevent him from buying Morse a pint after work, although he does try to wrapup one case quickly so his sergeant can attend his son’s sports day. Morse is a guru, not a mentor. The idea that Lewis might want promotion,albeit in the traffic division, fills him with distaste. And when Morse doestry to instill values in his colleagues it is to try to turn them on to opera.He inspires – as Lewis does intermittently, by example – in the sense that (asLewis says in one episode) “he’s the best there is”, not by histuition or advice. He solves crimes through a quasi-mystical process more akin to an artist creatinga painting than a manager making decisions. While, Frost arrives so often at acrime scene being pored over by constables and forensic scientists and stillmanages to spot the vital clue everyone else has missed that you almost suspecthim of planting evidence, Morse often relies on gut instinct – a method thatresearch shows may drive as many as a quarter of the decisions real managersmake. For instance, a chance remark by Lewis will often put him on the rightcourse and, like many real life managers, the inspector is frequently wrong. Hard to handle Morse’s isolation and arrogance mean he doesn’t build consensus as much asdestroy it. This makes for great television, but research from CornellUniversity’s Johnson Graduate School of Management finds that when real lifemavericks are introduced into groups trying to make a decision, other membersof the group find this hard to handle and complained that the decision-makingprocess has gone awry. Morses may have remarkable minds, but before you hire one remember that, asthis research suggests, they can be a real pain in real life. When Thaw was first approached about playing Colin Dexter’s detective, hemade it clear that although he liked the “old bugger”, the characterwould need to change. Although Thaw’s Morse usually develops a crush on atleast one female character in every story, he doesn’t (as Dexter’s does) scannewsagents for the right porn magazines. The change is crucial, Morse the lonely romantic is infinitely moresimpatico than Morse the lecherous old man. When he strays ethically – as hedoes bending the rules to try to convict a car dealer he believes guilty ofdouble murder – he does so not for personal gain or pleasure. His habitual grumpiness and iconoclastic approach to life, are a refreshingchange in a workplace where compulsory corporate euphoria is all too common.Researchers are only just starting to understand the emotional complexity ofwork, but Morse is the sulky antidote to the ‘have a nice day’ school ofcorporate life where employees are encouraged to behave in certain predictable(yet emotionally wearing) ways in the name of efficiency. Not for Morse, the masks many of us wear in the office: he is what he is –nonconformist, socially awkward, tightfisted, often hungover, resistant tochange and immensely gifted. All of which somehow makes it more believablewhen, in the very first episode, he is passed over for promotion tosuperintendent. The final irony of the Morse cult is that, while 12 million of us happily sharedtwo hours of our valuable time with him on our TV screens, none of us, frankly,could bear to work for the “old bugger” for as long as SergeantLewis. Up close and corporate: Redford epitomises work dilemmasRobert Redford’s turn as Nathan Muir, the retiring CIA spymaster in SpyGame, is merely the latest in a long line of roles in which Hollywood’s bestblond since Marilyn Monroe has played a tough, ethical maverick. The differencebeing that in Spy Game Muir is successful: he bluffs, deceives and cheats hisCIA superiors while achieving his goal of saving his old prot‚g‚ Brad Pitt froma Chinese prison.Normally when Redford comes over all hard-bitten and virtuous,everything goes awry. In Brubaker, he played a reform prison governor whosevery decency is such a threat to the powers that be they have to fire him. InUp Close And Personal, he plays a television news producer called WarrenJustice whose moral standards (and habit of telling the damning truth aboutanyone who doesn’t meet those standards) leaves him with only one careeroption: death. Redford/Justice is as distrustful of new approaches as Morse isof new technology, turning to one boss and asking him bluntly: “Did youever have an idea you didn’t get from a focus group?”In Out Of Africa, Redford’s individualism and understandabledesire to escape from Meryl Streep’s Danish accent lead his character DenisFinch-Hatton to a similarly tragic end. In The Horse Whisperer, he nurses asick horse back to mental and physical health, but has less success whisperingsweet nothings to his latest squeeze Kristin Scott Thomas.When a Redford character does succeed, there’s usually a price.In The Candidate, where he wins a California Senate seat, he abandons hisprinciples so completely that, by the time he gains power, he is powerless tothink without his spin doctors. Redford suffers from the gain the world/loseyour soul equation as the writer who never fulfils his promise in The Way WeWere and as the arrogant skier in Downhill Racer. He is most successful (andpays the smallest price) when he is organising a con with Paul Newman in TheSting or stealing a drugged horse in The Electric Horseman.Redford is rather liberal for an American actor in this day andage, but even so his films represent a rather stark message about survival inthe capitalist corporate environment. The message, in simplified tabloid form,seems to be that having principles can, at best, condemn you to a lonely lifewhispering to sick horses and, at worst, lead to the termination of your careeror your life. Just the kind of bleak world view Morse would approve of. Comments are closed. Morse’s codeOn 18 Jun 2002 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos. Previous Article Next Articlelast_img read more

Shielded Against Drug Trafficking

first_img Lt. Gen. Peña: We have a structure similar to UNASUR, or the South American Council of Defense, where there are not only several aspects of coordination, but cooperation in regard to drug trafficking, especially on information exchange. Diálogo: In recent years, Argentina and Brazil, which were once transit routes for drug trafficking, have become heavy drug consumers. Do you think this could also happen in Ecuador, a country that has been shielded from drug trafficking for several years? Lt. Gen. Peña: Ecuador is not shielded from this problem, but what we don’t have are coca crops. Even though there are few hectares that are controlled and destroyed, we can confirm that our country does not manufacture narcotics. However, we are a transit country, and we have become a nation that stores drugs for export. Drug trafficking submersibles constructed in the country have been found, and we detected illegal drug-related flights. There are also large drug trafficking rings that use our country as a transit country. We are not immune to the effects of this menace; although we are not producers, it is a warning sign that we have become a transit country. So we are urged to take strong action against it. On the other hand, drug use in other countries, such as Argentina and Brazil, has increased, as in Europe and the United States, where it is extremely high. Ecuador is not immune to this problem, because society can be influenced by this trend. As a policy of the Ecuadorean Ministry of Health, campaigns are carried out to avoid this problem, because there is evidence that young people are coming into this world [of drugs]. There is an alarming amount of microtrafficking of drugs in our country, but we have not reached the levels of other nations. We want to avoid it, so the state is taking action to prevent this problem. Lt. Gen. Peña: We have several commitments for relief efforts internationally. Hemispherically, we are engaged in assisting any of the countries that need our help if a natural disaster takes place. We have sent humanitarian assistance and teams to countries such as Chile, when the earthquake and the tsunami happened; to El Salvador, Honduras and to Colombia when they had floods. Furthermore, we have assisted Haiti with humanitarian assistance, in addition to our contribution to the United Nations. We have not only sent assistance, but we have also received it when disasters battered our territory. For example, during last year’s floods, we were immediately assisted by countries such as Colombia, Venezuela and Chile, based on particular agreements. This is also the case of transnational crime and drug trafficking. In our country, the Ministry of Interior, the Ministry of Justice and the National Police are in charge of dealing with these issues, which also have assistance protocols, especially for information exchange, allowing them to have state jurisdiction to combat these scourges. Besides, as the Armed Forces, we are seeking to increase collaboration efforts with the United States Southern Command, since we know that they have an interagency organization [Joint Interagency Task Force–South] in Key West, which can be of great help. We are eager to establish further contact with that institution for countering drug trafficking and organized crime successfully. Diálogo: Can you tell us about Ecuador’s bilateral or multinational agreements in the region? After his participation in the IV South American Defense Conference from July 24 to 26, 2012, in Bogotá, Colombia, Lieutenant General Jorge Peña Cobeña, chief of the Joint Command of the Armed Forces of Ecuador, talked with Diálogo. He stressed that interagency cooperation at national, regional and hemispheric levels is essential to humanitarian missions and the fight against drug trafficking and transnational organized crime. Diálogo: Lieutenant General Peña Cobeña, what is the role of Ecuador’s Armed Forces in humanitarian assistance and relief efforts in case of natural disasters? Lieutenant General Jorge Peña Cobeña: In Ecuador, the national secretary of risk assessment is in charge of preventing and dealing with natural disasters. Obviously, there is close coordination with the Armed Forces, based on already established planning and protocols developed with this office, so that in case of disaster, we can act immediately as Armed Forces in a direct way, with our infrastructure and support personnel genuinely committed. Diálogo: What are your thoughts about having a regional institution to coordinate humanitarian assistance and natural disaster relief, as well as having an organization against drug trafficking? center_img By Dialogo January 01, 2013 IF WE DON’T LEARN FROM WHAT HAPPENED IN COLOMBIA AND ACT ACCORDINGLY NOT ONLY AT THE NATIONAL LEVEL BUT ALSO REGIONAL AND WHY NOT, EVEN GLOBALLY, WE WILL LEAVE OUR GRANDCHILDREN WITH QUITE A CRAPPY WORLD, IT WILL BE WORSE THAN THE ONE WE GOT FROM OUR PARENTS AFTER THE END OF WWII – [email protected] last_img read more

Integrated tourist platform Rijeka Marketplace presented

first_imgThe integrated system is planned to be further expanded, and already offers numerous facilities in Rijeka this summer, where citizens and guests are offered a large selection of easily accessible city services used with just a few clicks, through a digital wallet installed on the user’s mobile phone. Payment is made via the mobile Rijeka Wallet application, which provides the service user with the possibility of personal identification and shopping on the online platform. According to the creators of the application, this type of service is becoming increasingly dominant in Europe, where when using a paid service, a scan code must be performed from the user’s mobile device. Bravo Rijeka. Rijeka Marketplace is a project of the Tourist Board of the City of Rijeka, which with partners – JuiceCommerce and Multilink Digital media – in an effort to digitize and apply the most modern technologies in tourism has developed an infrastructure for developing smart destinations in Rijeka and its surroundings, based on blockchain technology. “With the implementation of this application, Rijeka ranks among the top cities with innovative solutions in tourism, which is logical given the fact that Rijeka is recognized as one of the leaders among fast-growing destinations and European smart cities. “, Said the mayor of Rijeka, Vojko Obersnel, expressing the belief that many cities in Croatia and the world will follow such solutions to facilitate tourist navigation in the city. The director of the Tourist Board of the City of Rijeka, Petar Škarpa, stated that the project, launched last year, will change the way of advertising, promotion and use of services in tourism, adding that it is very well accepted by all involved associates. “We followed the trends in the world, but we did not copy anyone, but we took a different approach with the implementation of blockchain technology in tourism”, Said Škarpa, adding that the platform will be fully completed by the end of 2019. The project was presented in more detail by Michael Hasler from JuiceCommerce and Maša Radišić from Multilink / Digital Media. “Rijeka is thus placed on the international map of innovations, at the moment there is no such application anywhere in the world“, Said Hasler, adding that blockchain technology on this service enables the cooperation of different systems of individual services in one place, which are not complementary to each other. center_img The Peek & Poke Museum presented the digital platform Rijeka Marketplace, an integrated service that combines the promotion of tourist services and products and their purchase. The platform in one place and in a simple way provides all the information about Rijeka as a tourist destination, offers easy sale of services for various events, but also accommodation in hotels and apartments, public transport and products. The application represents a major step forward in the way of offering tourist services, is a place of central meeting of tourist supply and demand, and allows entrepreneurs in tourism to use the latest technologies in a convenient and simple way. The wish is for the platform to further contribute to Rijeka’s tourist traffic and consumption in this destination, which is extremely important in the context of next year’s events when Rijeka will become the European Capital of Culture. Also, an analytical system is being developed that will process all data on the use of the platform for market research and service improvement. Explore the Rijeka Marketplace HERElast_img read more