Limerick clubs benefit from capital grant allocations

first_imgEmail Limerick’s National Camogie League double header to be streamed live WATCH: “Everyone is fighting so hard to get on” – Pat Ryan on competitive camogie squads TAGSFine GaellimerickPatrick O’DonovanSenator Maria ByrneSports Capital Grantssports infrastructure Billy Lee names strong Limerick side to take on Wicklow in crucial Division 3 clash NewsCommunityLimerick clubs benefit from capital grant allocationsBy Editor – November 29, 2017 1745 Facebook Previous articleCCTV system expanded to 14 Limerick townsNext articleLimerick TD confirms Kilcornan road safety work Editor WhatsApp Printcenter_img Predictions on the future of learning discussed at Limerick Lifelong Learning Festival Limerick Ladies National Football League opener to be streamed live Linkedin RELATED ARTICLESMORE FROM AUTHOR Twitter Limerick Artist ‘Willzee’ releases new Music Video – “A Dream of Peace” Advertisement Sports grants89 clubs and organisations in Limerick and Clare are to receive €2,465,629 of the €30 million available in Sports Capital Grants.Confirming the allocations, Limerick City Fine Gael Senator Maria Byrne said they will help to develop sports infrastructure in the city and county.She also paid tribute to former Minister of State with responsibility for Sport Patrick O’Donovan for simplifying the application process for clubs and organisations.Sign up for the weekly Limerick Post newsletter Sign Up “Minister O’Donovan significantly shortened the application form, and published a helpful guide to the application process.There were also a series of regional workshops to assist applicants. I know from speaking to local clubs and organisations these measures really helped with their applications,” she explained.“The Sports Capital Programme was re-instated by the last Fine Gael government in 2012, after it had been cut by Fianna Fáil in the wake of the economic crash. It represents an excellent value for money investment. It is crucial we invest in sport and the health of our population, particularly with obesity is on the rise. Investing in sport is good for the health of the nation, both literally and economically.“Fine Gael is using our economic progress to invest in communities around the country and ensure that everyone can benefit. Sport is just one important element of this. In 2016, more than €22.8 million was paid out to 680 organisations to support the development of sports facilities and the purchase of sports equipment through the excellent Sports Capital Programme,” Senator Byrne concluded.More news herelast_img read more

What’s Holding Black Homeownership Back?

first_img Seth Welborn is a Reporter for DS News and MReport. A graduate of Harding University, he has covered numerous topics across the real estate and default servicing industries. Additionally, he has written B2B marketing copy for Dallas-based companies such as AT&T. An East Texas Native, he also works part-time as a photographer. Black Homeownership Sales 2019-05-21 Seth Welborn Share Save Tagged with: Black Homeownership Sales in Daily Dose, Featured, Market Studies, News Sign up for DS News Daily Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days ago What’s Holding Black Homeownership Back? Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Data Provider Black Knight to Acquire Top of Mind 2 days ago The Week Ahead: Nearing the Forbearance Exit 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago Demand Propels Home Prices Upward 2 days agocenter_img  Print This Post Home / Daily Dose / What’s Holding Black Homeownership Back? About Author: Seth Welborn The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Related Articles May 21, 2019 1,978 Views The black homeownership rate is not vastly different now than what it was when the 1968 Fair Housing Act became law, according to an article by economist John Wake in Forbes. Wake notes that black homeownership increased by 20% from 1950 to 1970, before housing discrimination was outlawed. Since the Act, however, the rate has remained flat. Wake offers some possible explanations. Wake notes that, as a form of compromise, the Fair Housing Act did not include strong enforcement powers. “Just four months after the Fair Housing Act was signed into law, the Housing and Urban Development Act of 1968 was signed into law,” Wake said. “It included the soon to be infamous Section 235 program from FHA that let lower-income people who couldn’t qualify for other mortgages get these new subsidized mortgages with down payments as low as $200 and subsidized, below-market interest rates as low as 1%.”On top of a lower homeownership rate, black and hispanic neighborhoods have also experienced a higher rate of foreclosure, on average, especially in the years following the financial crisis. A recent report from Zillow stated that, based on the gap in housing between communities of color and white communities, homes in black and Hispanic neighborhoods are 2 and 2.5-times more likely to experience foreclosures than those in white communities, respectively.What has led to the flat black homeownership rate, even in recent times? According to Wake, the answer is an “inelastic supply,” over-stretched homeowners, high foreclosure neighborhoods, and what Wake calls a “Super Slo-Mo Feedback Loop.” “Sometimes things happen so fast they’re hard to see. With real estate, sometimes things happen so slow they’re hard to see,” Wake says.Bridging the Black Homeownership GapA recent report by the Urban Institute suggested five possible solutions to help increase homeownership rates among African-Americans. According to the report, bridging this gap will require several approaches:Advancing policy solutions at a local levelTackling housing supply constraints and affordabilityPromoting an equitable and accessible housing finance systemOutreach and counseling for renters and mortgage-ready millennialsA focus on sustainable homeownership and preservationEarlier this year, the American Mortgage Diversity Council (AMDC) also presented a webinar delving into the topic, entitled “The State of Housing in Black America.” During that webinar, Charmaine Brown, Director, External Outreach and Engagement, Office of Minority and Women Inclusion at Fannie Mae, pointed out that “African-American homeownership rates are the same as it used to be in 1968, whereas the number of incarcerations in the community as well as the wealth gap between black and white families tripled between 1968-2016.”Click here to view that webinar. Servicers Navigate the Post-Pandemic World 2 days ago Governmental Measures Target Expanded Access to Affordable Housing 2 days ago The Best Markets For Residential Property Investors 2 days ago Previous: FHFA Director Mark Calabria’s Plan for Conservatorship Next: Measuring Mortgage Debt Subscribelast_img read more