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Finsbury reports positive bread and cake sales

first_imgFinsbury Food Group has reported a 9.4% rise in total sales to £207m.In a pre-close statement providing an update on trading for the full financial year, ending 30 June 2012, the Cardiff-based bakery manufacturer said its larger cake division saw a 9.2% increase on last year to £152m.Sales in Finsbury’s bread and free-from division were up 10% to £55m, which the company attributes to a strong growth in the fresh gluten-free market and its Vogel’s bread brand.John Duffy, chief executive of Finsbury, said: “The group has come a long way to achieve annual sales of over £200m for the first time, despite very challenging market conditions. This is testament to the hard work and resilience of the management teams and the quality and breadth of products they produce.“With no let-up in market conditions anticipated, we continue to invest in growth areas and improved efficiency to maintain this success.”Finsbury produces a range of celebration cakes and low-fat cake slices, in addition to artisan, organic and gluten-free bread and morning goods.last_img read more

A river of concern

first_imgThe Western world takes clean water for granted. Twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week, the precious liquid flows with the twist of a tap, instantly ready for a drink or a shower.But those living in developing nations know differently. “Do we have water?” is often the question on people’s lips in New Delhi, said artist Atul Bhalla, who grew up in the Indian capital where access to clean water has been a problem for decades. Water in the rapidly expanding city remains scarce and available only twice a day, in the morning and at night.As a child in the city, Bhalla recalled how residents were only allowed water once a day. As a man, he was enthralled when he sampled his neighborhood’s first swimming pool.His personal experience has informed much of his art. His projects involve sculpture, photography, installations, and video that explore water in its historic and cultural contexts and that strive to raise consciousness about dwindling access to the vital resource.On a wall in the Harvard Art Museums/Arthur M. Sackler Museum is one of Bhalla’s efforts from 2005, a series of 14 self-portraits of the artist submerging himself in a placid river. The background’s muted colors and the reflection of Bhalla’s face and shaven head in a flat mirror of water lend the shots an otherworldly, almost spiritual quality. But the work’s title, “I Was Not Waving But Drowning II ”(borrowed from a work by the English poet Stevie Smith that tells of a man struggling in the ocean and frantically waving for help to those on shore), hints at something darker and poses lingering questions for the viewer.Bhalla was brave to take the plunge. The river is the Yamuna, the largest tributary of the Ganges, and while Hindu teaching says that anyone who dips in its sacred waters will not fear death, it is toxic from years of pollution.During a gallery talk on March 2, the artist discussed his work with a small crowd as part of the museum’s Two-Point Perspective series, which considers objects from additional vistas.Explaining his creative process for the project, Bhalla said he and a friend took the shots on a cold, early December morning in the town of Jagatpur, where Delhi’s drains empty into the Yamuna, filling it with raw sewage and industrial waste. His friend first snapped shots of Bhalla from the shore, but was only able to capture the top of the artist’s head. So he stripped down and joined Bhalla in the water, where he took the photos at eye level.Bhalla said he had to “become one with the water” to remain still enough to achieve the desired mirrorlike effect and to come to terms with being in the polluted river. He also addressed the ambiguity of the photographs and the work’s title, admitting that his creations allow for various interpretations.“I leave the viewer with a question, so that the work lives on within” them.During a discussion on March 3, a panel of scholars reflected on the work. Sugata Bose also grew up in India near the river and commented that the once-pristine water is no longer blue and “doesn’t flow as it did before.” Bose, Harvard’s Gardiner Professor of Oceanic History and Affairs, asked the artist if his work reflects his anger, frustration, or exasperation over the state of the Yamuna today.“I want to keep [that] out of my work,” replied Bhalla, “otherwise I would feel it would become too didactic. Once it’s too didactic, people don’t come back to” it.Bhalla discussed an earlier public art project where he handed out cups of bottled water near the Yamuna from a kiosk shaped like a water can, along with stickers that read “Have you ever seen the Yamuna? Have you ever touched the Yamuna?” In addition, he presented his piece “Yamuna Walk,” a series of photographs and accompanying text that he compiled on a four-day excursion along the river in 2007.Both projects were an effort to get people to engage with the river that is barely accessible and largely hidden because of buildings and dams along its banks, said Bhalla.“If you don’t see it, if you don’t smell it, you are not going to clean it up,” he said, adding, “It’s such an important part of life in Delhi and we forget it.”last_img read more

Tony Stempeck, Guardian of a Restaurant’s Legacy, Dies at 63

first_imgAround a decade ago, Mr. Stempeck devised a way to determine what exactly went into the dishes.“I went down to the restaurant, weighed every canister of spice in the kitchen, she made the sauce, I reweighed the canisters, and then we knew,” he told The Reno Gazette Journal.- Advertisement – After the death of Mr. Stempeck’s mother, Ms. Kramer ordered business cards for him inscribed with her old title: owner-operator.They arrived the day Mr. Stempeck died. One night while working at Casale’s he took the purse of Janet D’Amico, a customer, and hid it behind the bar to keep her around. They had a whirlwind courtship, married in 1990 and divorced in 2003. Ms. D’Amico died in 2007.In addition to his daughter Haley, Mr. Stempeck is survived by another daughter, Cierra Marin; two brothers, Charlie and John Stempeck; three sisters, Madaline Zanoni, Maria Rogers and Helen Jayme; and his partner, Lynne Clark.A devoted father, Mr. Stempeck ordered wood chips and top soil for the construction of a playground at his daughters’ elementary school. He volunteered in the school’s front office, as a crossing guard, at bake sales, at spaghetti buffet fund-raisers. Casale’s regulars, accustomed to the Tony who poured shots of Jägermeister, found it hard to believe, but for two years running he was parent of the year.- Advertisement – – Advertisement – For the first time, the Casale’s family had written recipes.“We’ve been raised to take the restaurant over,” Mr. Stempeck added. “It’s a part of keeping Old Reno alive.”Anthony Patrick Stempeck was born on March 2, 1957, in Reno. His mother and his father, Casimir Stempeck — known by his Navy nickname, Steamboat — ran Casale’s, which Ms. Stempeck’s maternal grandparents had founded as a grocery store in 1937. Tony grew up in a house out back, so close that he could leap from his front door into the back door of the restaurant. He graduated from Sparks High School in 1975.- Advertisement –last_img read more

Guyana reap rich rewards for investment

first_imgTHERE was a new name in the mix for FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup qualification earlier this year, as Guyana reached the latter stages of a lengthy CONCACAF campaign.Although a member of CONCACAF, Guyana is situated at the northern end of the South American mainland and is the only English-speaking nation on the continental landmass.Guyana’s football pedigree at international level has, in truth, been modest since gaining independence in 1966. Progressing to the penultimate stage of 2014 FIFA World Cup Brazil qualifying remains a standout achievement.But it is in women’s football where Guyanese investment over the past few years is starting to yield tangible rewards. The national side – the Lady Jags – qualified for the eight-nation 2010 CONCACAF Women’s Championship to provide an early insight into their potential.Guyana’s female footballers celebrate during their CONCACAF U-20 Championship campaign. (Photo compliments: CONCACAF)More recently, the U-20 side won an unprecedented six straight matches en route to the quarter-finals of the continental championship, falling just one step short of what would normally be the FIFA U-20 Women’s World Cup qualification round. Their charge was ended only by a strong Haiti side and their free-scoring forward Melchie Dumornay, with the Caribbean nation impressing in their maiden U-20 Women’s World Cup appearance at France 2018.The start of Guyana’s progression dates back some four years with the arrival of current Technical Director Ian Greenwood, and the national roll-out of a female-targeted grassroots campaign. Soon after came Guyana Football Federation’s (GFF) first Women’s Development Officer, Tricia Munroe, such appointment being a central part of a national football development strategy.2018 proved to be even more significant with a women’s national league held and the international senior women’s programme re-launched. The nation also hosted matches in qualifiers for the CONCACAF Women’s Championship.“This success is no accident,” Greenwood told FIFA.com about the U-20 team’s achievements. “It is clear evidence that the GFF’s national football philosophy and robust youth development strategy are producing top-class performers and coaches. The GFF ATC (Academy Training Centres) programme is regarded by FIFA/CONCACAF as a model of best practice for a youth development structure within the Caribbean region.“We have a national playing and coaching philosophy, which is implemented across all national teams, combined with an age-specific coaching curriculum.Coach education has reached new heights since 2016 with a record number of licensed coaches and instructors in Guyana. This new workforce of talented grassroots coaches is continually unearthing and nurturing new female talent.“Through Guyanese migration, we have a unique situation, which means we have a large talent pool abroad to select from, based in Canada, USA and the UK. These players significantly strengthen the group due to playing in stronger leagues.”Harnessing latent talent in a modest population of some 800 000 remains a challenge for the nation’s football leadership.“The country remains relatively underdeveloped, infrastructurally, resulting in most football venues having very little or no changing room or washroom facilities readily available for female players,” GFF president Wayne Forde told FIFA.com.“This has severely impacted the growth and development of the game at club and community level. However, despite these fundamental challenges, the female game remains most popular throughout our hinterland regions and is played spiritedly, year-round, by our indigenous tribes, where countless talented national team players have been discovered over the years.”There are more opportunities ahead for a clearly ambitious GFF. Guyana have qualified for this year’s CONCACAF U-17 Women’s Championship where three tickets to India will be up for grabs.“The recent performance of the U-20 women’s team was a watershed moment for the country, signalling to the powerhouses of CONCACAF that Guyana had arrived,” Greenwood added. “They represented the spirit of the Golden Arrowhead (Guyana’s National Flag) with heart, determination and self-belief throughout the competition.“The success of the team really caught the imagination of the general public in Guyana, which was fantastic for the football brand in a nation better known for its cricket. The team’s performances inspired a lot of young girls to get involved in football and showcased what we can do with the right approach.“We believe that the gap between the traditional big nations and the smaller nations is closing within our confederation.“We have key ambitions to move up the FIFA/Coca-Cola Women’s World Ranking and our flagship goals are attaining FIFA top-60 ranking, CONCACAF top-10 ranking, CFU top-5 ranking, senior team Olympic qualification in 2024, and the ultimate target of World Cup qualification in 2027.”(FIFA.COM)last_img read more

Back to School Picture Special: Class begins for pupils across Donegal

first_imgBack to school season is upon us this week as schools all over Donegal welcome new arrivals through their gates.Primary and secondary schools are celebrating all the new happy faces in their halls with great photos and sending them into Donegal Daily.This picture special shows first years, baby infants and even babies on their first days marking important milestones. Check out the photos below, and if your school wants to share their photos, email [email protected] Glenmaquin NS welcomes two new infantsSt Columba’s NS Ballylast CastlefinnPhilip, Sophie, Grace and Caitlin on their first day at St Columba’s NS Ballylast Castlefinn with their teacher Joleen McHughRay Outdoor School, RathmullanIt was a busy first week at Ray Outdoor School, Rathmullan. On their first day back the children were busy making mud paintings and leaf puzzles in the forest. Owner Sally O’Donnell joined the children as they explored the outdoor setting which provides endless opportunities for learning. Located close to Rathmullan, the outdoor school is part of a trio of Early Learning Schools across Donegal where children spend 90% of their time outdoors. To find out more about Early Learning Schools and the benefit of outdoor learning visit earlylearningschools.ie.Ray Outdoor School, RathmullanRay Outdoor School, RathmullanRay Outdoor School, RathmullanRay Outdoor School, RathmullanRay Outdoor School, RathmullanRay Outdoor School, RathmullanRay Outdoor School, RathmullanRay Outdoor School, RathmullanRay Outdoor School, RathmullanRay Outdoor School, RathmullanFinn Valley College, Stranorlar welcomes First Year Class of 2017/18Finn Valley College First Year StudentsFinn Valley College First Year StudentsFinn Valley College First Year StudentsFinn Valley College First Year Students1ú Bl 2017 at Coláiste Ailigh,  Leitir Ceanainn Back to School Picture Special: Class begins for pupils across Donegal was last modified: September 6th, 2017 by Rachel McLaughlinShare this:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on LinkedIn (Opens in new window)Click to share on Reddit (Opens in new window)Click to share on Pocket (Opens in new window)Click to share on Telegram (Opens in new window)Click to share on WhatsApp (Opens in new window)Click to share on Skype (Opens in new window)Click to print (Opens in new window) Tags:Back to schooleducationfirst yearspicture speciallast_img read more